Stainless Steel Ball Bearing Baren for Japanese Mokuhange Woodblock Printing

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Stainless Steel Ball Bearing Baren for Japanese Mokuhange Woodblock Printing

265.00

Kean Ball Bearing Baren

for hand printing Japanese style woodblock prints / mokuhanga

For relief print wood or lino on paper up to 250gsm

The KBB Baren allows you to print various types of relief printing and monotypes to any scale using either water base or oil based inks.

The baren originally introduced to Japan by the Chinese during the Muromanchi Period (1338-1572) produces equally effective and frequently more interesting results than a Western printing press. The KBB Baren is portable, inexpensive and does not restrict the size of the print or paper used.

Traditionally the Japanese baren is made from split bamboo sheath twisted into a string, which is then made into a coil. The coil is then backed with a disc of laminated paper. The coil and backing are then wrapped in a well smoothed out bamboo sheath, which protects the coiled string and forms a handle.

The KBB Baren is made from a disc of high-grade plastic, which suspends stainless steel balls balls, allowing them to form pressure points for printing. The construction enables the balls to rotate freely which delivers multiple pressure points evenly across the disc. The baren is bound in black leather with a strong leather handle and measures 13 cm in diameter. Occasional rubbing on an oiled felt pad is the only maintenance required. The Baren should be kept dry at all times.

The baren is handmade by Roslyn Kean in her studio in Australia

The KBB Baren has been highly recommended Michael Schneider head of printmaking , Tokyo National University of Fine Art, Tokyo, Japan. Also used widely in Finland and recommended by Tuula Moilanen and Tetsuta Noda in Japan

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